Loose wiring on a pole on Avenida Mascarenhas de Moraes, in Monte Castelo.  (Photo: Henrique Kawaminami)
Loose wiring on a pole on Avenida Mascarenhas de Moraes, in Monte Castelo. (Photo: Henrique Kawaminami)

The problem of broken wiring spreads across Campo Grande. It has in the Monte Castelo neighborhood, in Jardim São Lourenço, in Santa Emília, in Chácara Cachoeira, in Vila Rica. But the issue goes from a nuisance to a risk of death when it ends up in the necks of motorcyclists. The most recent case was at the dawn of 2022.

On the second day of the year, motorcyclist Andreia Nogueira Patino, 44, was trapped by the neck in loose wires, in the Santa Emília neighborhood. The desperation of the situation, in which the journalist falls to the ground and tries to free herself from the cables, was recorded on video.

The same scare crossed the path of a personal trainer on October 18, 2014, at the corner of 25 de Dezembro and Dom Aquino. The cables wound around his neck, causing cuts. The matter ended up in court.

Judgment of the 10th Civil Court of Campo Grande sentenced Claro and GVT to pay R$ 12,885, an amount that must be corrected, including late payment interest. According to lawyer Vinícius Santos Leite, the process is in the appeal phase. “We were successful in the first stage and companies appealed”.

Telefônica Brasil S/A, the successor by incorporation of GVT, claimed that the sentence was wrong, “since it was not proven that the wires that caused the alleged damages to the plaintiff would be his property”. Claro asked the TJ-MS (Court of Justice of Mato Grosso do Sul) to reduce the amount of compensation.

Broken and abandoned wiring on a pole on Rua do Rosário, also in Monte Castelo.  (Photo: Henrique Kawaminami)
Broken and abandoned wiring on a pole on Rua do Rosário, also in Monte Castelo. (Photo: Henrique Kawaminami)

“Despite Claro being recognized as one of the largest companies in the telecommunications sector, the expenses arising from the provision of services with excellence are equally proportional, whether for the maintenance of buildings, stores, signal distribution network, payment of rents, compliance with the payroll of thousands of employees, payment of convictions, among others”.

With a deadline that is far from being the most severe, the law enacted by the Campo Grande City Council remains on paper. The text establishes up to 150 days for the regularization of wires and a fine of R$ 500 for the telecommunications company that does not carry out the maintenance. The law is from 2019, but it was not regulated by the city of Campo Grande.

Broken wiring in Ceará with Avenida Capital, in Campo Grande.  (Photo: Marcos Maluf)
Broken wiring in Ceará with Avenida Capital, in Campo Grande. (Photo: Marcos Maluf)

A “dead network” of cables continues to take up residence in the 116,684 posts that spread across the urban area. At the base of the jeitinho, the wires are wrapped around trees or thrown under the other cables attached to the posts.

One explanation for the disinterest of telephone and data companies in collecting the cables is because they do not contain copper, therefore, without economic value. Another situation is that with each service contracted, the company connects new wires, without removing the others.

Broken cable in a pole on Avenida Coronel Antonino.  (Photo: Marcos Maluf)
Broken cable in a pole on Avenida Coronel Antonino. (Photo: Marcos Maluf)

São Paulo law – In Piracicaba, in the interior of São Paulo, for example, the law provides for a fine for companies that leave strands loose or unusable. In 2020, the fine was one thousand reais. The public authorities have a telephone for complaints and the Public Works Department is responsible for inspecting and applying penalties.

Post with a tangle of wires, some broken, on Rua Ceará.  (Photo: Marcos Maluf)
Post with a tangle of wires, some broken, on Rua Ceará. (Photo: Marcos Maluf)

Leave a Reply