With your help, the WWF wants to evaluate numerous images from satellites in order to determine the number of walruses in the Arctic.

WWF conservationists are looking for citizen scientists to help spot walruses from their own homes.

Great Britain – The conservationists from WWF are looking for “citizen scientists” who should help Walrosse to discover from their own home.

With your help, the WWF wants to evaluate numerous images from satellites in order to determine the number of walruses in the Arctic. © vladsilver / 123RF

Little is known about how many walruses are left in the Arctic.

A new WWF project with the curious name “Walrus from Space” should now provide a remedy.

Since the researchers cannot do the work alone, the public is asked to help.

Coburg "police falcons" get a new nest box
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Coburg “police falcons” get a new nest box

The so-called citizen scientists are supposed to spot Atlantic walruses on a variety of satellite images.

The project leaders are calculating aloud Guardian with half a million people participating and looking through thousands of high resolution satellite images.

Although the WWF could also use automatic image recognition software, it would not achieve the same level of accuracy as the work of human eyes.

By reporting all animal sightings to WWF and the British Antarctic Survey, the scientists hope to shed light on how many walrus specimens exist along the Arctic coast. The seal species plays an important role in the Arctic ecosystem.

Rod Downie, chief polar advisor at WWF, said: “What happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay there. The climate crisis is a global problem, bigger than any person, species or region. Before hosting this year’s global climate summit, Britain needs to step up its ambitions and everyone.” keep his climate promises – for the sake of the walrus and the world. “

Hannah Cubaynes, Research Associate at the British Antarctic Survey, added: “Assessing walrus populations using traditional methods is very difficult because they live in extremely remote areas, spend much of their time on the sea ice and move around a lot. Satellite imagery can do this Solve problem.”

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