Maya Jama poses up a storm in plunging blue dres

She is known for showing off her figure and edgy sense of style on social media.

And Maya Jama was up to her old tricks once more on Monday as she wowed in a chic blue dress ahead of her appearance on Would I Lie To You.

The star, 26, added a caption reading:’When you have 3 mins to get a pic before the show starts ..(F**k knows why the claw hand came out) SO much fun on Would I lie to you tonight @bbcone at 8;30pm to see how good a liar I am’.

Not feeling blue!Maya Jama was posing up a storm on Monday as she wowed in a chic blue dress ahead of her appearance on Would I Lie To You

Not feeling blue!Maya Jama was posing up a storm on Monday as she wowed in a chic blue dress ahead of her appearance on Would I Lie To You

Maya looked sensational in her chic blue dress as she leaned forward on steps outside the studio, while showing her cleavage and legs.

She then got snap happy in the studio while sitting on the panel and beaming.

Her latest slew of snaps comes after Maya used her profile for good byurging fans to book their smear tests after suffering complications through delaying her own.

Addressing her Instagram followers earlier this month, the presenter and radio host revealed that she has suspected cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) as a result of putting off her test for a year.

Wow!The star, 26, added a caption reading: 'When you have 3 mins to get a pic before the show starts ..(F**k knows why the claw hand came out) SO much fun on Would I lie to you tonight @bbcone at 8;30pm to see how good a liar I am'

Wow!The star, 26, added a caption reading: ‘When you have 3 mins to get a pic before the show starts ..(F**k knows why the claw hand came out) SO much fun on Would I lie to you tonight @bbcone at 8;30pm to see how good a liar I am’

CIN is an abnormal changes of the cells that line the cervix and does not cause any symptoms, so is unlikely to be discovered without a smear test.

Discussing the news with her followers, Maya announced:‘It’s very rare I get serious but I don’t see it talked about enough. Girls, if you haven’t done already, go and get your smear test.

‘I know it seems butters and uncomfortable and awkward but it’s not that bad and it’s so important. I’ve just had to get my second one because I left it a year for my second check-up. You’ve just got to check on these things.’

After being inundated with messages from fans, theDon’t Hate the Playaz star elaborated on her experience.

Spoke out:Her latest slew of snaps comes after Maya used her profile for good by urging fans to book their smear tests after suffering complications through delaying her own

Spoke out:Her latest slew of snaps comes after Maya used her profile for good by urging fans to book their smear tests after suffering complications through delaying her own

She continued: ‘As some of you know I find it hard to be serious about anything but I might as well tell you what’s going on because I’m getting so many messages from loads of people saying, “I’ve been putting it off”…

‘There’s these things I’m not a doctor, probably not the right terminology but I think they’re called “CINs”, and he thinks I have CINtwo.

‘So the first one is fine, [with] CIN two you have cells that you need to monitor and then the third is cancerous stuff or will become cancerous.

‘So when I went today, he took a biopsy, so like a little bit inside of me, and that’ll get sent off and I’ll find out.’

Candid:Addressing her Instagram followers earlier this month, she revealed that she has suspected cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) as a result of putting off her test

Candid:Addressing her Instagram followers earlier this month, she revealed that she has suspected cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) as a result of putting off her test

What is a smear test and why have there been delays in lockdown?

A smear test detects abnormal cells on the cervix, which is the entrance to the uterus from the vagina.

Removing these cells can prevent cervical cancer.

Most test results come back clear, however, one in 20 women show abnormal changes to the cells of their cervix.

In some cases, these need to be removed or can become cancerous.

Cervical cancer most commonly affects sexually-active women aged between 30 and 45.

In the UK, the NHS Cervical Screening Programme invites women aged 25-to-49 for a smear every three years, those aged 50 to 64 every five years, and women over 65 if they have not been screened since 50 or have previously had abnormal results.

Women must be registered with a GP to be invited for a test.

Smear-test delays during lockdown have prompted calls for home-screening kits for HPV.

During the first national lockdown, smear test services were paused in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as well as in some practices in England.

While services have resumed inScotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – it was revealed last week thatwomen in England are having difficulty accessing smear tests, with patients experiencing cancellations and long wait times.

Last week Tory MP Caroline Nokes, who chairs the Women and Equalities Select Committee, said that check-up cancellations and women’s fears of attending GP clinics during the pandemic could mean up to 600,000 women miss out on getting a smear test.

She added: ‘You basically have to monitor these things and it’s better you catch it sooner rather than later so it doesn’t go into something else.

‘Just get checked, don’t put it off, it’s minor. They’re professional doctors, they’ve seen a million fannies, they’re not going to be shocked by any.

I know that’s a weird thought because I always thought like, “Oh my God, they’re gonna see my noon”, but it’s just minor.’

Later in the day, Maya revealed she was overwhelmed with the impact her message had on her followers.

Maya – who recently replaced Stacey Dooley as host ofBBC Threes Glow Up: Britains Next Make Up Star – spoke out about the response while getting to work on her new show.

She wrote: ‘Thank you for your messages, can’t reply to all but seeing how many of you have now booked to get the smear because of my stories is so good!’

Getting serious: Maya announced, 'It's very rare I get serious but I don't see it talked about enough. Girls, if you haven't done already, go and get your smear test'

Important:Women are invited to have smear tests every three years between the ages of 25 and 49, and then every five years until they reach 65

Getting serious: Maya announced, ‘It’s very rare I get serious but I don’t see it talked about enough. Girls, if you haven’t done already, go and get your smear test’

Earlier this month,a senior MP and charity warned that cancellation of cervical cancer checks because of Covid pressures is putting women’s lives at risk,

Tory MP Caroline Nokes, who chairs the Women and Equalities Select Committee, said that check-up cancellations and women’s fears of attending GP clinics during the pandemic could mean up to 600,000 women miss out on getting a smear test.

She warned against women’s medical issues being ‘pushed to the back of the proverbial queue’.

During the first national lockdown, smear test services were paused in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as well as in some practices in England. The Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust charity estimated 600,000 fewer tests than normal were carried out last April and May.

Women are invited to have smear tests every three years between the ages of 25 and 49, and then every five years until they reach 65.

Wow:Later in the day, Maya revealed she was overwhelmed with the impact her message had on her followers

Wow:Later in the day, Maya revealed she was overwhelmed with the impact her message had on her followers

Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust said: ‘While it is not ideal if you can’t get a test, and you may be feeling worried, cervical cancer takes many years, not months, to develop and remains rare.

‘It’s unlikely that it would develop in the time that your appointment is delayed. If you think you’re experiencing symptoms of cervical cancer, whether you are waiting for a test, up to date, or have never been, contact your GP.’

A spokesman for the NHS said: ‘The NHS guidance that cervical screening should continue has not changed and this has been communicated to GP practices.’

What iscervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN)?

About 6 in every 10 people have abnormal cells in their cervix known as cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cervical glandular intra-epithelial neoplasia (CGIN).

This is not cancer, but there’s a risk it could turn into cancer if untreated.

Abnormal cells may be detected while a colposcopy is carried out, but a biopsy will be needed to determine what the risk of these becoming cancerous is and whether treatment is needed.

The different types of abnormal biopsy result and what they mean are as follows:

  • CIN 1 it’s unlikely the cells will become cancerous and they may go away on their own; no treatment is needed and you’ll be invited for a cervical screening test in 12 months to check they’ve gone
  • CIN 2 there’s a moderate chance the cells will become cancerous and treatment to remove them is usually recommended
  • CIN 3 there’s a high chance the cells will become cancerous and treatment to remove them is recommended
  • CGIN there’s a high chance the cells will become cancerous and treatment to remove them is recommended

In rare cases, a colposcopy and biopsy will find cervical cancer. If this happens, you’ll be referred to a team of specialists to discuss treatment.

Source NHS

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