The Marabú was saved, in a auction, by The Argentinian Tango Society (Photo: Instagram / salonmarabu).

Go down from Maipú street towards the hall of the Marabou, implies entering a Buenos Aires cabaret of those that no longer remain. Literally. Founded in 1935, is the only one of the historical spaces of the night of Buenos Aires that is still standing. Along the way were the Chantecler, the Maipú Pigall or the Tibidabo, and Marabú was also about to disappear, if it had not saved, in a auctionthe very English The Argentine Tango Society.

I also read: National Tango Day: who was Julio De Caro

Ironies of Destiny, an institution based in London and New York, is dedicated to preserve and spread our citizen music. Since last December, with the renovated space, the Marabú was once again filled with musicians and dancers. It no longer joins the night with the morning, as in the days when it housed the orchestras of Aníbal “Pichuco” Troilo, Osvaldo Pugliese and Juan D’Arienzo. When his legendary bartender prepared the berlin 45the drink inspired by the war that was finally beginning to end.

The Marabú was saved, in a auction, by The Argentinian Tango Society (Photo: Instagram / salonmarabu).

The time dictates other customs and other rules, but what preserved is a witness to collective history. In the absence of an archive -and although they have rescued some photos of Troilo, Discépolo, Goyeneche, Pugliese and other figures who animated their evenings-, the miraculous validity of the Marabú serves as a banner of what, in cities like Buenos Aires, where there are treasures such as the tango, must be preserved.

The Marabú shone again (Photo: Instagram / salonmarabu).
The Marabú shone again (Photo: Instagram / salonmarabu).

In the eighties, with another name, Marabú gave space to rock. It was the first place where Soda Stereo played, and Los Abuelos de la Nada, Virus and Los Twist also took the stage. Now that other languages ​​and other accents are heard again, when tourism picks up, the Marabú shines again.

To a great extent, thanks to the fact that at the front there is a group of exquisite connoisseurs of tango and its history, with Silvina Damiani in the lead. We chatted with her while we toured the room that the milongueros step on again. We also chat with jesus mela, fantastic presenter who transmits enthusiasm in inspired rhymes. Jesús knows what he is talking about: his father, “el Negro” Mela, put his charisma for years to the performances of Pugliese and other great tango musicians. A character from Buenos Aires whose heir continues the tradition, conjugating it in the present.

Leave a Reply