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United Nations agency for gender equality and the empowerment of women (UN Women) establishes that, within the private sphere, one of the usual forms of violence Its the economic character.

The economic violence It consists of achieving or trying to achieve financial dependence on another person, maintaining total control over their financial resources, preventing them from accessing them and prohibiting such daily actions as work or attend school.

For the former Argentine judge and vice president of the Ibero-American Academy of Law of Family, Grace Medinathe economic violence it is “The worst of the violence that exists is the mother of violence because it is a condition of other violence”.

During his participation in the closing of the XIV Latin American Congress of Childhood, Adolescence and FamilyMedina assured that this type of violence shows the power relations within the couple, making the woman, in order to have a roof and food for herself and her children, “tolerate physical, psychological and sexual violence”.

In his opinion, “economic violence harms the most is children” when they are used as a bargaining chip in discussions between adults and the child support payment.

“There are economic violence in non-payment of food. Non-compliance with food, in its different variants, constitutes a particularly insidious mode of violence”, he maintained.

The lawyer stressed that “There are no cases of food claims against women” rather, child support sentences are imposed on men.

Another characteristic that he evidenced is that it affects all social strata, but with a greater impact on the vulnerable people. The Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) in its 2021 report, it establishes that 209 million people live in poverty.

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Few complaints

Medina highlighted that, unlike what happens with cases of physical or sexual violencethe economic violence produces “so much submission that women do not denounce”.

The lawyer demands that there be a state response before each case.

“The only way for poor women to become independent is with an answer, women’s homes are useless,” she clarified.

He gave the example of the program “accompany you”, an initiative that emerged in Argentina during the pandemic, with which, for six months, the Government provides the applicant with a minimum wage.

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Graciela Medina with María Fontemachi, organizer of the Congress. (CLAUDIA FERNANDEZ/LIBRE DIARY)

“It’s not forever, it’s so they can take off, it’s so they can leave home, feed their children, train and strengthen themselves,” he said.

“What is the use of having a convention that condemns violence if the State does not give the guarantees?” Was the reflective question that the lawyer sowed in the audience.

damage repair

During her presentation, the former magistrate told the story of a Dominican migrant who settled in Argentina without a legal residence card. The lady was married to an Argentine and worked as a housewife and together with her partner, she contributed to the construction of a house together. The man told her that he would put her property in her name since she lacked documents.

At the end of the construction, the man threw the woman and her daughter out of the house. The woman took the case to the courts where they recognized that she had contributed to the construction and the child’s food expenses, but, when the damage was quantified, they only returned the equivalent of three pairs of shoes

“Every victim of economic violence He has the right to compensation for damages and for this, he must know the legislation,” concluded Medina.

Contained expenses

In the Dominican Republic, alimony is regulated by Law 136-03 of the Code for the Protection of the Rights of Children and Adolescents. This includes the care, services, and essential products for the maintenance and development of the minor: food, housing, clothing, medical care, recreation, and education.

Journalist, lover of travel, fashion and live music. Foodie.

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