In this sober film, a 35-year-old father has to look for a home for his son.

In this sober film, a 35-year-old father has to look for a home for his son.

Four-year-old Michael does not want to live in another house in another city. He likes it at home. But Papa John, a single window cleaner, doesn’t have long to live. Of course he wants to find a family for this sweet-tempered little fellow where he can be well off. Nowhere special sends them on a quest through households full of good intentions.

Ruben Aerts

It could be the impetus for a film that looks for the shortest way to the tear glands. Kudos to Uberto Pasolini, nephew of icon Luchino Visconti, because he fits for flimsy tricks. The director-screenwriter prefers to keep it sober, small and sincere. He does not anticipate the grief.

Briton James Norton (Little women) knows how to put an appropriate sobriety in his portrayal of the caring and concerned father. The intimacy between him and the boy (Daniel Lamont) is uncomplicated.

The film, based on true facts, owes its tenderness and emotion to everyday scenes. There is no emotional peak where Pasolini – who previously scored as a producer with the sympathetic The full monty – cleverly built up. No puffy monologues or sad violins: reality is sad enough for a man in such a situation.

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