The cases of misogyny and porn that scandalize the British Parliament

The British Parliament has been at the center of misogyny and pornography scandals that have shocked and embarrassed the United Kingdombut they are the tip of the iceberg of a larger problem of sexism rooted in many deputies.

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The latest scandal was carried out by the Conservative MP Neil Parish, who was suspended last night from the formation in power after being accused in recent days of looking at pornography on his mobile while participating in the sessions of the House of Commons.

The politician, who has refused to resign, will be investigated by the Lower House Standards Committee, which must assess the MP’s conduct and rule on whether he was guilty of inappropriate behavior in the Westminster (central) Parliament.

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The Labor Party and the Liberal Democrats, in opposition, have called for the resignation of Parish, a deputy for the constituency of Tiverton & Honiton (in the southwest of England), and described the attitude of the “tory” parliamentarian as “disgusting”. 65 years old.

“This marks another low level of the Commons. It is clear that he is not ready to be in Parliament,” veteran Labor MP Harriet Harman told the media.

After being identified as the deputy who watched porn, Parish said he was able to “mistakenly” open the porn video, although several deputies were witnesses and a secretary of state, whose identity has not been revealed, claimed to have seen him do the same during a session in a committee of the House of Commons.

This scandal came to light after the controversy over anonymous statements by several “Tory” deputies, who falsely accused Labor’s “number two”, Angela Rayner, of trying to distract British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, crossing and uncrossing the legs in the control sessions to the “premier”.

Those deputies compared Rayner to the American actress Sharon Stone, who in the movie “Basic Instinct” uncrosses and crosses her legs in a now famous scene.

The extent of the misogyny against Rayner forced Johnson and other parliamentarians to stand in solidarity with politics and denounce such “unacceptable” attitudes in parliament.

Rayner is a charismatic MP, rising through the Labor ranks, and has often stood in for the party’s leader, Keir Starmer, in Prime Minister’s scrutiny sessions, where she has stood out for her strong speaking skills and has put embarrassment to the Head of Government in matters of national interest.

These cases are added to another 56 complaints of alleged sexual misconduct filed against other parliamentarians, including three members of the Conservative government and two opposition spokesmen, who have not been identified at the moment.

Behind that image of good manners of the deputies, who in the Commons are addressed as “the honorable gentleman” or the “honorable lady”, always through the president of the chamber, there are hidden macho and backward attitudes among some parliamentarians.

The British Minister for International Trade, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, went so far as to admit that on one occasion an MP pushed her against a wall and made sexual advances towards her, and acknowledged that “many times” she was the victim of misogyny from colleagues.

The president of the Women and Equality Committee of the House of Commons, the Conservative Caroline Nokes, admitted that sexism is institutionalized in the Conservative Party and that she has been criticized for denouncing this situation.

“I know that male colleagues have been in the corridors of Westminster blaming me for leaking (these cases), blaming me for talking about this as if it were something that would be better hidden,” Nokes admitted in an interview with The Times.

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