The leader of protests in Ecuador asks soldiers not to kill their parents

The president of the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of the Ecuador (Coanie), Leonidas Iza, asked this Wednesday that the repression of the demonstrations against the President’s government cease William Lasso (Conservative), and asked the police and soldiers “not to kill their parents, their brothers.”

LOOK: National strike in Ecuador: why is it expected to be difficult for the parties to sit down to negotiate?

Iza, in a speech delivered at the Central (State) University of Ecuador, in the center of Quito, lamented that there are at least three people dead and many seriously injured in the environment of the social protest, which celebrated its tenth day consecutive.

The main promoter of the mobilizations against the Executive recalled that many of the soldiers and policemen who repress the protests are relatives of those who exercise the right to mobilization, and added that the troop agents usually come from poor homes that have joined the claims.

“RIVERS OF PEOPLE WILL REACH QUITO”

Iza also insisted that the social mobilization will continue indefinitely and warned that “rivers of people will arrive in the capital” to strengthen the protest against the Government, if President Lasso does not give concrete answers to the ten points of the list of demands of the popular organizations.

The indigenous leader recalled that these demands have already been exhibited to the Government for a year, but stressed that the lack of response from the authorities is what forced the Conaie and other groups to call an indefinite national strike.

To the communities “we return with results”, but if there are no answers “we stay here”, in Quito, Iza remarked, highlighting the organizational power of the indigenous movement and the capacity for popular support that the strike has obtained.

“The struggle is financed by the people,” Iza remarked, rejecting a version of the country’s military command that had insinuated that the protest was sponsored by drug trafficking or organized crime, conjectures that have not been accompanied by evidence.

“We reject these irresponsible statements,” Iza replied, comparing the mobilization to “la minga,” an ancient Andean custom of community and voluntary work.

Likewise, the president of the Conaie assured that the mobilization coincides with the Inti Raymi, the sun festival of the Andean indigenous people that is celebrated in the summer solstice season, and for this reason he asked his bases to “fight and dance” as well. .

REQUEST SHEET

The indigenous leader recalled that the list of demands requires lowering the price of fuel to the levels prior to a rise made by the Government a few months ago.

Conaie’s request is that the already frozen price of extra or regular gasoline (85 octane) be reduced from $2.55 to $2.10 per gallon (3.7 liters) and that diesel, also frozen, pass $1.90 to $1.50 a gallon.

Likewise, they ask for debt relief for the peasants in the banks that, according to what he said, charge high interest rates that reach up to 30% and that regularly press with coercive lawsuits.

The Conaie also demands to improve the prices of agricultural products for small farmers and peasants and to prevent the precariousness of work with the labor reforms of flexibility promoted by Lasso.

The list of demands also demands the end of oil and mining actions in indigenous territories, agricultural areas and water sources; In addition, the Ecuadorian president’s proposal to double the extraction of crude oil is prevented.

Respect for 21 collective rights of indigenous peoples, that the privatization of State companies be eliminated, that the Government improve price controls in the food markets and that the rights to health and education be strengthened.

“There are a lot more” of demands, added Iza, who blamed the government for an eventual escalation of social tension, if it does not respond to the demands in a mobilization that has already left two protesters dead and no less than a hundred injured.

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