The year before last, Magava received an award - the PDSA Gold Medal, which is an analogue of the St. George Cross

The year before last, Magava received an award – the PDSA Gold Medal, which is an analogue of the St. George Cross

Photo: EAST NEWS

In Cambodia, a rat named Magawa was buried with honors. The rodent, who did not live to see its 9th birthday, was trained to search for mines.

Rats are the perfect sappers. They are lighter than dogs, which, due to their weight, can be blown up by mines, they have a finer sense of smell and higher speed of movement.

There are several organizations in the world that train rats, training them to search for unexploded mines and shells.

Magawa was a member of the Gambian hamster rat order. It is known that he was born in 2014 in Tanzania and in the second year of his life he began special studies. During his “service” Magawa became one of the best and most famous sapper rats in the world.

For 5 years of his work, he helped to clear the territory equivalent to 20 football fields, with his help more than 100 mines were cleared. And this record has not yet been broken by any sapper rat!

The year before last, Magawa received the PDSA Gold Medal, the equivalent of the George Cross, Britain’s highest civilian award, becoming the first rodent to be so honored. Prior to this, such a cross was awarded only to dogs.

In 2020, Magawa retired and spent the last months of his life without worries, relaxing and playing.

Magawa served in Cambodia. In this South Asian country, which has experienced many military conflicts, vast territories still pose a mortal danger to people due to the large number of mines and shells in the ground. Over the past half century, 64,000 peaceful Cambodians have been killed by mine explosions.

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