How to backup Twitter account.  Photo Twitter

Tweets, direct messages and uploaded content can be backed up. Step by Step.

After more than 100 employees of TwitterSeveral users expressed their concern about having a backup of the material uploaded to the social network.

Following Elon Musk’s changes, rumors that he might shut down for the weekend intensified. But everything is possible backup.

Many use the social network for work purposes. Others simply want to have a backup of their memories.

Thus, tweets, attached photos and videos, direct messages, likes, lists and “moments” can be protected, whatever the purpose.

Desktop (PC-Mac)




How to backup Twitter account. Photo Twitter

While logged into the account, click on “More” in the left column. Then select “Settings and support”, then “Settings and privacy”.

In “Your account”, select “Discharge a file of your data”.

You have to enter your Twitter password, and then an email or text message will arrive with a verification code that you must enter as well.

As of Friday, there were widespread reports that the text option was not working, but the email option seemed to work.

After submitting your password and verification code, press the big blue button that says “Request file.”

Once you’ve requested your details, it’s time to sit back and wait. Twitter says that “data may take 24 hours or more to be ready,” but that’s at best. As reported by several users who did, it takes a long time.

iOS and Android

From the phone you can also request the backup.  AFP photo


From the phone you can also request the backup. AFP photo

You have to touch the profile photo in the upper left corner, scroll down to “Settings and support” and then select “Settings and privacy“. Tap “Your account” and then “Download a file of your data.” You will be prompted to sign in to Twitter. Then follow the steps above.

When the file is ready you receive a notification from Twitter that will allow you to download a file to explore. The file will include an .html that can be opened in the web browser, making it easier to find data without any technical knowledge.

critical disclaimers

Musk lost important people on his team.  AP Photo


Musk lost important people on his team. AP Photo

After the company’s new owner has issued an ultimatum about adhering to a “cultural reset” of the company, more than 100 employees left the company: they began posting goodbyes on Slack, the company chat, and even emojis farewells on social networks.

The new purge of Twitter’s ranks comes after Musk recently fired dozens of employees who criticized or mocked him in tweets and internal messages. Musk then pinned a deadline this Thursday for all employees to answer “yes” in a Google form about whether they wanted to stay on what Musk calls “Twitter 2.0.”

Otherwise, today would be their last day of work and they would receive severance pay. After the deadline came around, hundreds of employees quickly began posting goodbye messages and greeting emojis on Twitter’s Slack, announcing that they had said no to the ultimatum of Musk.

The last two weeks have been a whirlwind for the company: changes to the Twitter Blue subscription (which meant losing the verification tick for accounts that already have it if they don’t pay $8 per month), new certifications of “official” for legitimate accounts, layoffs, Musk’s constant crosses with employees on the social network and more.

Twitter had about 2,900 employees remaining before Thursday’s deadline, thanks to Musk laying off about half of the workforce. 7500 people when he took office and the resignations that followed.

Remaining and departing Twitter employees told The Verge that given the magnitude of the resignations this week, they expect the platform to start crashing soon. One says they have seen “legendary engineers” and others look up to leave one by one.

The departing Twitter employees have been told they will receive at least three months of pay, though they have not yet had a chance to review their employment agreements. disassociation.

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