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Estonian Lauri Linnamäe posted a series of tweets, in which he shows that the alleged ID card of a member of the Ukrainian Azov unit is fake. The document was presented by the Russian FSB security service as evidence of the perpetrator of the murder of disinformationist Darya Duginová. She was supposed to be the Ukrainian Natalija Vovková.

“The Federal Security Service clarified the murder of Russian journalist Darya Dugina. The crime was prepared and committed by Ukrainian intelligence services,” the FSB public relations department said. “After the controlled detonation of the Toyota Land Cruiser driven by Duginová, Vovkova and her daughter left for Estonia via the Pskov Region on August 21,” the FSB claims. More see Flash.

And reality?

This is what the “Azov Units” card presented by the FSB looks like, as seen by basic forensic tools available online. Here specifically Forensically shows where the clone tool was worked in Photoshop

One method that does a good job of detecting photomontages is the analysis of lossy compression artifacts. The Error Level Analysis (ELA) imaging method usually uses edge detection, which is amplified, which leads to the display of even these artifacts that are not normally perceived by the human eye. If the distribution and character of these artifacts is significantly different in some part of the photo, it may mean that it is a foreign object that has undergone JPEG compression with different parameters than the rest of the scene. Tool Error Level Analysis z Forensically reveals such modifications in the field of photography on the ID card.

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Photo montages are also successfully detected by noise analysis. Every photo contains natural noise across the color spectrum. If the noise suddenly does not occur in some areas, or if it has a completely different character, the added data may be to blame: i.e. inserted elements or various adjustments. At the edges of the ID portrait, the noise has completely disappeared. This can never happen with photography and is further evidence of post-editing.

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Additional noise analyzes with different settings. Do you see the differences in the header, background, stamp? This is not a photograph, but work in a bitmap editor.

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And on top of that, such an ugly separation of the head from the original background! After all, this is not what a soft-edged “rubber” is used for, there are much better tools.

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The details in the areas where the stamp touches the face are quite unrealistic. As others in the discussion point out, both stamps with the Azov emblem are positioned exactly vertically. Human hands can’t do that twice on one card.

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Even the smudges on the back of the ID don’t look completely natural.

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Another detail from the discussion: “change of marriage date” is written in pencil on the ID card. So it is probably a returned card due to a name change obtained from some archive. Other posts then draw attention to the uniform in the photo, which does not correspond to the Azov unit, but to the National Guard of Ukraine.

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Detecting photomontage is relatively easy with the tools available for free today. Be sure to read the detailed article with links and examples:

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